thiscangobacktothearchives

October 31, 2014

Happy Halloween from the UJA-Federation Archival Team!

Filed under: audio-visual material, found in the archives — Tags: , — Heather Halliday @ 12:03 pm
Residents of the Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged celebrate the autumn season, 1978.

Residents of the Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged celebrate the autumn season, 1978.

October 30, 2014

Judaica Libraries

Beginning in the early 1980’s and continuing through the mid 1990’s, UJA-Federation’s Task Force on Art and Literature in Jewish Life (housed under the Commission for Synagogue Relations) worked with consultant Marcia Posner to help Jewish institutions in the greater New York City area set up Judaica libraries. Posner visited community centers and YM-YWHA’s, hospitals, homes for the aged, and camps, and worked with staff to either establish a library, or reinvigorate the institution’s existing library. With support from the Joseph Reiss Memorial Judaica Libraries Fund, UJA-Federation was able to provide grants for the purchase of Judaic materials relevant to each institution’s population.

One institution that benefitted from such a grant was the Mid-Island Y in Plainview, New York. In 1984, Posner visited the Y’s library and met with staff members Dorothy Savitt, Claire Raskin, and Ruth Cohen. In a June 20th letter to “Mesdames Savitt, Raskin, & Cohen,” Posner writes, “Without exaggeration, I declare the visit to your library and meeting with you an unmitigated delight.” Perhaps one reason for this was the dedicated and creative staff themselves, who wrote the lovely poems about the library and each other—in beautiful calligraphy—seen below.

Poem001 Poem002 Poem003 Poem004

 

On May 27, 1986, the Mid-Island Y was awarded $150 to purchase Judaica books. Find these poems and files on other Judaica libraries in the UJF subgroup.

October 28, 2014

Welcome to the team, Leah!

Filed under: Uncategorized — thiscangobacktothearchives @ 10:46 am

Susan, Marvin, Heather, and I would like to welcome Leah Edelman to the UJA-Federation of New York Archives Project! It will be very nice to have another processing archivist of her caliber on the project for the final year.

Leah received her Master of Science in Library and Information Science in 2014 from Simmons College with a concentration in Archives Management. Over last summer, she was a Junior Fellow at the Library of Congress and, while completing her graduate degree, she was a processing and outreach intern at the Schlesinger Library on the History of Women at Harvard University and, also, an archives assistant for the Tufts University Digital Collections and Archives.

In the coming months, in addition to processing, Leah will join us as another contributor to this blog and will contribute archival description to our finding aid for the UJA-Federation of New York collection.

Again, welcome, Leah, we are glad to have you as a new member of our team!

October 23, 2014

Cultural Arts at Federation

The files of the Cultural Arts Department in the Community Services Division (8 Bankers boxes) at Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (FJP) were recently processed. From 1979 to 1986, the date range of files in the collection, the Cultural Arts Coordinator (CAC) position at Federation was held by three people: Terry E. Sutton (1979-1981), Jeanne B. Siegel (1981-1984), and Rabbi Daniel Landsman (1984-1986). The CAC position was established under the Community Centers and Y’s umbrella and it is unclear whether the position continued after the merger of Federation with UJA in 1986. No additional files have been found.

According to the documentation, prior to 1979 FJP and its agencies had limited involvement or interest in Jewish arts and culture programming. It was not until the 1970s that Federation began to encourage agency programming that emphasized a Jewish component. For example, in the field of Jewish Education, outreach to unaffiliated Jews and informal Jewish education was a low priority goal. In 1979 FJP began to expand its role into the area of Jewish arts and culture when they obtained a grant from the New York State Council on the Arts for $5,000. It was this grant that served as the leverage for obtaining an additional $22,500 from three outside foundations. In 1980, the Cultural Arts Committee of Federation created an incentive grant program to see if seed grants could influence new initiatives in agency programming in the Cultural Arts.

From 1980 to 1985, the CAC compiled the “Guide to the Arts and Culture: The New York Jewish Experience”, a listing of Jewish art events in New York. It was published in The Jewish Week, and cosponsored by the National Foundation for Jewish Culture (NFJC) and the Jewish Art Subsidy Fund (JASF). It started out as a quarterly four page supplement and became a weekly full page feature. Even if one could not attend the concerts, plays, lectures, or special events, it made one feel that there was something exciting going on. In 1983, the first of three Jewish Arts Festivals of Long Island was held, and the William Petschek Music Fund was established, both demonstrating Federation’s new commitment to the Jewish arts.

The Cultural Arts Coordinator was a leader and specialist in the cultural and arts worlds. The CAC acted on behalf of Federation to carry out a variety of functions in providing assistance to agencies and coordinating activities throughout the metropolitan area. The Coordinator provided technical assistance to arts workers at Federation’s community centers and other agencies, through individual consultation, workshops and seminars. Topics included the use of media, grantsmanship and public relations. In addition to coordinating activities and programs among the community centers, the CAC created a clearinghouse for the performing artists who joined Federation’s affiliate artists program, to encourage the development of programs by individual centers throughout the New York City area. In 1984, the clearinghouse turned into a directory of Jewish Artists, a published resource guide for agencies’ use. Finally, the Coordinator participated in fundraising to help agencies submit proposals to government sources.

The Cultural Arts files are interesting for their coverage of different facets of arts and culture and for giving a flavor of the Jewish arts scene in the 1970s and early 1980s. There are many files on the directory, which was called, “In The Jewish Tradition: Directory of Performing Artists.” Included are the files and photographs of artists who were included in the Directory as well as files of artists to be published in its Supplement. The artists were exclusively performing artists, including actors/actresses, singers, mimes, storytellers and poets. Below are several images from the Artists’ directory files.

Aida Weiss

Aida Weiss, international songstress

Donald Heller, The Hurdy-Gurdy Man (puppet theater)

Donald Heller, The Hurdy-Gurdy Man (puppet theater)

Joe Elias (folksinger)

Joe Elias, folksinger

The Kol Golan Duo, folksinging duo

The Kol Golan Duo, folksinging duo

The Western Wind, Vocal Ensemble

The Western Wind, Vocal Ensemble

October 13, 2014

Tubby Stayman

Filed under: audio-visual material, the process of archival processing, UJF people — Heather Halliday @ 9:47 am

During the course of processing a set of UJF portrait photographs recently, I discovered these two images of Mrs. Samuel M. Stayman, a.k.a Tubby Stayman.

Two portraits of Tubby Stayman from 1970 and 1983, found in UJF / Marketing and Communications/ Photographs / Portraits

Two portraits of Tubby Stayman from 1970 and 1983, found in UJF / Marketing and Communications/ Photographs / Portraits

Regular readers of this blog will recall mention of Mrs. Stayman as the principal organizer of the annual UJA-Federation Bridge Tournament event, which has been a highly successful Women’s Division fundraising tool for UJA and UJF over the years. Coming across pictures of Tubby was one of those gratifying moments of collection connection that happen relatively rarely during the course of routine archival processing. Few things are more satisfying to an archivist than finding additional material on a previously noted person or event in a completely different part of the collection months later.

It is likely that this group of nine boxes of portrait photographs will present many opportunities for future researchers to make such connections in their own work since the UJF – Marketing and Communications – Photographs – Portraits subsubseries holds the images of over 6600 people, who will all be individually identified and searchable within the collection finding aid when our project is complete.

 

October 1, 2014

New American Jewish Historical Society Website and a New Project Webpage

Filed under: resources — Tags: , , — thiscangobacktothearchives @ 10:55 am

Last week, the American Jewish Historical Society’s brand new, bells-and-whistles website went live and it looks wonderful.

New American Jewish Historical Society website, screen shot, accessed on October 1, 2014

New American Jewish Historical Society website, screen shot, accessed on October 1, 2014

When you visit the new website, please also visit our new webpage by clicking on the icon, “UJA-Federation of NY Collection”

Icon to the new UJA-Federation of New York Archives Project webpage, screen shot, accessed October 1, 2014

Icon to the new UJA-Federation of New York Archives Project webpage, screen shot, accessed October 1, 2014

There are many resources related to our ongoing project available on our new webpage, including links to our Flickr album, the blog that you are currently reading, and links to a collection of digitized oral histories of Federation and UJA-Federation staff, leaderships, and volunteers. The webpage features hyperlinks to the partial finding aids for Subgroup I: Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York, 1916-1986 and, post-merger,  Subgroup IV: United Jewish Appeal-Federation of Jewish Philanthropies, 1986-2000. And that’s not all, there are links to the digitized minutes of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies, Board of Trustees (1916-1986) and Executive Committee (1973-1986), as well as minutes and other materials from the Brooklyn Federation of Jewish Charities (1916-1944) and minutes from the UJA-Federation’s Board of Directors meetings (1986-1992).

New UJA-Federation of New York Archives Project webpage, screen shot, accessed October 1, 2014

New UJA-Federation of New York Archives Project webpage, screen shot, accessed October 1, 2014

Congratulations to the American Jewish Historical Society for its new website and we hope that you will visit our new webpage on that website soon!

September 18, 2014

Updated FJP preliminary finding aid now available

Filed under: early history, the process of archival processing — thiscangobacktothearchives @ 2:28 pm

We are excited to announce that an updated but still-partial finding aid to the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of New York (FJP) subgroup I, covering the years 1909 to 1986, is now available here: http://digifindingaids.cjh.org/?pID=1944047.

FJP_blog_post_cropped

This preliminary finding aid describes material of over 500 Bankers boxes (over a football field in length).  The following sections of the collection are now available to researchers:

  • Minutes of the Board of Trustees and the Executive Committee – including links to the digitized files of all of these minutes
  • Files of the Executive Vice-Presidents
  • Finance Department Annual Agency files
  • Fundraising Department Campaign files – don’t miss the digitization of a wire recording of a 1957 campaign workshop
  • The Brooklyn Federation of Jewish Charities files – many of these files have been digitized and are linked to the finding aid

We anticipate that these areas will be of immediate interest to researchers.  Please note the following:

  • If you would like to go directly to the folder lists and the digital files, use this link to the downloadable container list.
  • If requesting boxes to see in the Reading Room, researchers are advised to use this form, with the reminder that boxes are off-site and must be requested at least 2 business days in advance of their visit
  • A link to the partial finding aid for the UJA-Federation (UJF) subgroup IV (1986-2000) can be found here: http://digifindingaids.cjh.org/?pID=2188444
  • And a link to the completed finding aid for the Oral History collection subgroup V can be found here: http://digifindingaids.cjh.org/?pID=365697

The completed finding aid to the entire FJP collection as well as the other subgroups will be available in the middle of 2015. Please stay tuned.

September 11, 2014

Welcome back, Marvin!

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — thiscangobacktothearchives @ 1:30 pm

One of the archivists working on the UJA-Federation of New York Archives Project broke his foot in July and was, unfortunately, unable to get into work. After several weeks of recovery, we are happy to have Marvin back to work, processing, smiling for the camera, and recording the order of folders in boxes ready to go to off-site storage.

Welcome back, Marvin!

Welcome back, Marvin!

The American Jewish Historical Society was kind enough to throw Marvin a welcome back lunch party with falafel, baba ghanoush, and hummus.

A plate in lieu of a smile at Marvin's welcome back lunch--falafel and baba ghanoush

Welcome back lunch–falafel and baba ghanoush

Welcome back, Marvin, hope that you fully recover and thank you for all of the work that you do for the project!

 

September 4, 2014

Missing Boxes and Zip Codes

Filed under: found in the archives, interesting or noteworthy archival material — susanwoodland @ 6:19 pm

This week we received an unexpected delivery of 7 boxes from off-site storage.  Longtime residents of our “missing boxes” list, these 7 had originally been requested for delivery in 2012 and 2013.  Although boxes with content related to all of the 7 were processed some time ago and are already off-site again, having the boxes in front of us will allow us to now include files that would otherwise have been permanently missing.

The boxes range over numerous series, and bulk dates ranged from 1970 through the 1980s: 3 boxes from the Marketing and Communications Department; 1 box from the Medical/Aged functional group; 1 box of Martha Selig’s files, 1 Project Renewal box, and a box from the Executive office.

One document that surfaced in the first box is this memo, from someone’s administrative file from 1963, a memo :

Changes to Federation mailing records

Changes to Federation mailing procedures, 1963

 

I find it interesting that the addition of Zip Codes to addresses would involve actually meeting with representatives of the Post Office, but it no doubt helped them plan what changes would have to be made to their mailing operations.  After all, Federation conducted a large part of their fundraising through the mail, including mailings to very large lists of contributors throughout the year.  As enumerated in the memo, any change to the format of an address would mean changes to thousands of addresses in their master file, to the plates on their Addressograph machine, and, even in 1963, to addresses in their data processing systems.

Also of interest is the fact that Queens had more zip codes than Manhattan in 1963.  Is that still the case?

September 2, 2014

UJA-Federation of New York Collection – Archivist

Filed under: Uncategorized — thiscangobacktothearchives @ 12:13 pm

AMERICAN JEWISH HISTORICAL SOCIETY
JOB DESCRIPTION

Date:                              September 2014
Department:                   Library & Archives
Title:                               UJA-Federation of New York Collection – Archivist
Schedule:                       F/T through end of project, September 30, 2015
FLSA Status:                  Non-exempt
Supervisor’s Title:          Senior Project Archivist
Salary:                           TBD depending on experience, with benefits
Application Deadline:     September 22


SUMMARY: Performs arrangement and description, rehousing and basic preservation of the United Jewish Appeal – Federation of New York Records. This is a temporary (one-year) position funded by a grant from UJA-Federation of New York, at the American Jewish Historical Society.

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS (approx. 80%): Processing of institutional papers in a team with 4 other project archivists

  • All work performed according to MPLP processing standards, including processing rate for this project at an average of 6 boxes per week. (required)
  • Arrange records according to series and subseries lists developed by the Project Archivist in consultation with members of the project team. Establish order of and within folders as directed. (required)
  • Write complete, well-edited historical notes, scope notes and other documentation for finding aid series as they are processed. (required)
  • Create folder-level contents lists for inclusion in the finding aid. (as needed)
  • Prepare records for archival storage by performing preservation procedures as appropriate, such as refoldering and reboxing of the materials into acid-free folders and boxes, and selective fastener removal; mark boxes for later preservation photocopying as needed. (required)
  • Identify and separate oversize items, photographs, audio, film and video materials within the collections to ensure preservation and proper archival storage. (required)
  • Must be able to lift full bankers boxes (up to 40 pounds), and pull them on and off the shelves (required)
  • Perform other duties as required.

ADDITIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES (approx. 20%):

  • Work with other members of the project team to coordinate the arrival of unprocessed boxes from off-site storage and the transfer of processed boxes to off-site storage. (required)
  • Contribute to refinement of project workflow. (as needed)
  • Contribute to project blog (www.thiscangobacktothearchives.wordpress.com) on a regular basis. (desired)
  • Assist with selecting visual materials from the collection for scanning, for AJHS publications, exhibits and special events. (required)

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS

Skills and Abilities:

  • Familiarity with archival theory and techniques, specifically in using MPLP – More Product/Less Process – (minimal processing) to work with very large collections.
  • Proven ability to understand hierarchical relationships between series and subseries within a collection and to survey numerous boxes to discover the original order, if one exists.
  • Previous experience working with large collections and/or organizational records.
  • Proficiency in MS Word and Excel
  • Ability to work both independently and collaboratively.
  • Reliability and accuracy in maintaining records.
  • Excellent communication skills and good rapport with colleagues.
  • Ability to complete tasks in a reasonable amount of time and able to multitask.
  • Capable of learning new skills.

Education and Training: MLS from an accredited school.

Work Experience: Experience in processing archival collections required.

ADDITIONAL DESIRED QUALIFICATIONS

  • Expertise with Extensible Markup Language (XML), specifically creating electronic finding aid using Encoded Archival Description (EAD).
  • Ability to read Yiddish and/or Hebrew.

WORKING CONDITIONS:

Physical Demands: Ability to lift 40 pounds.

Special Environmental Factors: Periodic exposure to dusty and moldy materials.

Please send resume, cover letter and sample finding (link or attachment) to:

jobs@ajhs.org / Subject: UJA-Federation position

The American Jewish Historical Society is an equal opportunity employer.

Older Posts »

The WordPress Classic Theme. Blog at WordPress.com.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: